Watch Fox News Claim Transparency In CEO Versus Worker Pay Is Corporate ‘Slut Shaming’ (VIDEO)


If you’ve ever wondered how much truth there is to claims of a conscious class war going on in America, read this article and watch the ridiculous video below.

Fox “News” had the audacity Tuesday to make the absurd claim that working a stipulation into the upcoming Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform Act stipulating that publicly traded companies need to supply information that shows the ratio of CEOs to average workers’ pay is the same thing as “slut shaming.” They do this while surrounding one masculine CEO with a semi-circle of attractive women flashing lots of leg reading from scripts who attempt to tell viewers that knowing the ratio of CEO to average worker pay is a terrible idea because it will be “something people can tap into, they can harness it and leverage it for their own use.”

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Right, because it’s a terrible idea if workers know how much they’re being underpaid and under-respected as their salaries don’t amount to quite enough to live on while CEO’s live out their caviar dreams. If there is nothing out of whack, nothing to be ashamed of, why all the worry over putting all cards on the table for all to see and understand? It may be a terrible idea, but not for workers, who will most certainly be unhappy with the information brought forth. No, it’s a terrible idea for the CEOs who wish to keep that information out of the grasp of workers’ hands in order to keep exploiting them.

Do you hear and understand what Fox “News” is saying?

They’re worried workers will see how much more CEOs make than the workers who keep the company alive. Without the workers, there IS no company. There is no product. Yet Fox “News” and its establishment pets sit there with their dubious CEO and dare to tell the public that releasing such information as worker to CEO pay ratios will be a terrible idea. They are afraid folks will wake up to the very real and active class war that has been being waged against average citizens for centuries, and even more so, that you, I, and virtually everyone we know will begin to revolt and demand more pay.

Heaven forbid a CEO only makes $20 million instead of $30 million.

No one is advocating cutting short what anyone deserves for running a company, but the converse must also be true. CEOs must stop cutting short what workers deserve for being the lifeblood of each and every company out there. Regulations of some sort need to be in place to help safeguard workers against under-pay and exploitation before America starts implementing its own suicide nets.

A discussion is sorely needed as to what is in fact a fair distribution of wealth gained by any business between the CEO and the company’s workers. It’s been shown through successful co-ops that businesses can be run without CEOs, but how many CEOs have you seen run major corporations without workers? Yet CEOs on average bring home far more in wages than typical workers. Something is amiss. The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform Act seeks to help lend some transparency to the conversation. It does not seek to reform wages at this point, but only point out wage discrepancies, yet look how the Fox-bots carry on. That should tell readers something right there, as well.

According to the Washington Free Beacon, Kennedy Montgomery claimed on Tuesday’s “Out Numbered” that the Security and Exchange Commission instating the Dodd-Frank request would ultimately cost companies “millions” simply to figure out the ratio between workers’ and CEOs’ pay. Somehow, I remain skeptical of that assumption.

And look how Montgomery frames the conversation:

They are essentially trying to slut-shame companies into paying their highest workers less.

No, “they” are trying to bring in rational common sense to get greedy CEOs – the highest worker (singular) — to pay the overwhelming majority of the company’s workers more.

The message also under this is that old “Wall St.” line, “Greed is good,” and folks shouldn’t be shaming CEOs for being greedy.

No? Not even when Walmart workers cost taxpayers how much in public subsidies and “entitlement” programs because Walmart’s upper crust won’t pay workers a livable wage? That greed is not good; it’s entirely corrosive of our infrastructure and well-being.

No matter, though, co-host Andrea Tantaros follows Montgomery’s bullsh*t right up.

And slut-shaming companies is not the job of the U.S. government. There’s plenty of people who work in the federal government who are sitting around picking their nose at their computers who could do this on their own. That’s not a good use of taxpayer dollars.

Where does one even start with these processed, programmed automatons?

First of all, there is heavy irony in using women, who have typically been underpaid in corporate environments, to tell the public that workers need to be happy with what little they have and let the boss keep hogging more and more. Check the stats on worker to CEO pay ratios over the last hundred years and see if you don’t notice a trend toward the top – I dare you. Add the co-opting of the women’s issue of slut shaming to the mix and the irony about breaks your back.

Then consider the claim that workers in government are just sitting around picking their noses (meaning liberal noses, no doubt) when the public is always told every other time how hard people in public office work.

Then consider the last thought that makes no sense whatsoever. Whether the government works through Dodd-Frank to bring out these numbers, or whether, as Tantaros argues should be done, workers in the federal government busy picking their noses bring out the numbers, either way it is taxpayers’ money that pays for the time that brings those numbers and that conversation forth. There’s virtually no difference. She is arguing, essentially, to have the cost come from the very same place it already will be, but posits it as if it is a critical, smart alternative in order to suggest the move being implemented by Dodd-Frank is ridiculous. Now that’s ridiculous.

Fox “News” then continues its ventriloquism act through Tantaros by having her say:

The only people who should care about this are the shareholders.

Again, the argument comes from the angle of greed – those who seek to profit off the sweat and backs of workers.

No, the people who care about this are the workers, themselves – the ones who are living hand to mouth or making far less than they should, but who actually earned their share through creating the products that make up the heart and soul of the company. Surely the workers will and should care, don’t you think, Tantaros? But again, Tantaros conveniently leaves the workers out of the equation, which is a subtle way of manipulating the public mind to do the same, making the Fox angle seem more acceptable. Sure, CEOs should be able to keep their pay, if you forget about the workers.

Workers? Workers who? I didn’t mention anything about workers.

Fox “News” host Shannon Bream then goes on to say what was mentioned above, that workers finally realizing that the company CEO makes, oh. . . say 268 times more than they do (or more!) would “foment” people into being “very angry, and that’s something that people can tap into, they can harness it and leverage it for their own use.”

Sure they can, say, for better wages? You think?

You see, people are less likely to demand better wages if they don’t understand how screwed over they’re being by the upper echelons of the company.

Then Fox has the further audacity to have their lapdog CEO and co-host Bo Dietl tell viewers that CEOs deserve that much more because they work harder than anyone in the company.

Dietl stated:

It’s nobody’s business. If you can find me a good CEO that’s going to bring my market cap, I’ll pay him anything. And [former GE CEO] Jack Welch had a great idea. Take the 10 percent on the bottom, fire them so everyone works harder.

Not only does Dietl believe he deserves so much more than the workers who make his business a real entity outside his imagination, and not only does he agree that those workers should not be entitled to more of the company’s profits, he believes an even better incentive is to scare workers to death by firing the bottom 10 percent! Keep them fearful of losing their meager paying jobs and watch how much they’ll hustle for you. That’s how the boss-man cracks the whip in this modern era.

And dig how he refers to CEOs as “him.” Again, women have been traditionally underpaid in the corporate environment. “[F]ind me a good CEO that’s going to bring my market cap, I’ll pay him anything,” (emphasis my own), yet lets have these ladies in short skirts surround him and tell the public that this male-dominated corporate upper crust deserves every outrageous dollar over everyday workers. Beautiful, Fox “News.” Beautiful.

And the jive didn’t stop there, either. Montgomery went on to suggest that fewer regulations was the answer to CEOs sharing the wealth with its workers more.

It is the Fed’s monetary policy, which is creating this false bubble on Wall Street, which is enriching CEOs, and if we would have less regulation, we would have naturally more wealth in this country.

If you’re paying attention and have a critical mind, you’ll realize right there is another place Fox “News” and Montgomery screwed up. She just admitted that pay ratios are out of whack, but shifted the conversation to regulation versus deregulation to fix a problem they’ve spent the whole prior period of the “news” segment arguing was not a problem.

Fox “News,” you so crazy.

H/T: Raw Story | Featured image: YouTube

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