FDA Says Marijuana Derivative is EVIL — But Let’s Give Them ALL The Oxycontin They WANT


Proving that Big Pharma has the Federal Drug Administration safely stowed in its back pocket, the FDA recently approved the use of a form of the powerful painkiller Oxycontin for children ages 11-16.

This idea was the result of a push by Connecticut’s Purdue Pharma, a pharmaceutical company funded exclusively by physicians. Purdue Pharma generates most of its income from the sale of powerful painkillers, such as the one most recently approved.

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Rather than conduct a comprehensive study on the efficacy of cannabis-derived tinctures, such as the popular Charlotte’s Web, and other marijuana-related offerings, the FDA would rather expose our children to the highly addictive opiates, all so Big Pharma can continue to make a buck.

So it all looks on the up-and-up, the FDA’s guidelines for the drug state that the initial prescription can only be written for 20 milligrams for a period of five days, to see if the children can tolerate it. As Dr. Sharon Hertz, Director of Anesthesia, Analgesia and Addiction Products for the FDA stated:

We are always concerned about the safety of our children, particularly when they are ill and require medications and when they are in pain. OxyContin is not intended to be the first opioid drug used in pediatric patients, but the data show that changing from another opioid drug to OxyContin is safe if done properly.

So let’s get this straight. The FDA would rather continue to ban the use of a NATURAL compound that has been proven to treat children for a variety of maladies, especially severe seizure disorders, but pass out Oxycontin-like opioids like they’re candy? Maybe they will be packaged in PEZ dispensers with cartoon characters spitting them out? Here you go Johnny — time to take your Oxy. Come inside Susie — you’re overdue for your Rushbo.

Start ’em young — you’ll have a customer FOR LIFE.

Featured image via sanasana.com

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