Whoops: Donald Trump Mistakes 9/11 For 7-11


Donald Trump wants to make America Great Again™ — and that begins by remembering 7/11, the day officially devoted to the first voyage of Chinese Admiral Zheng He. That or he confused it for the convenience store whose parent company is headquartered out of Tokyo, Japan. I can’t be sure which.

“New York values”

Ted Cruz got in hot water back in January when he attacked “New York values” — i.e., a dog whistle for Jewish people. And while he’s tried to correct this since, he left a hole in his defense going into the New York primary large enough to pass the Empire State Building.

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This hole, however, was still too small for Donald Trump’s ego.

Trump attempted to capitalize on Cruz’s remarks while campaigning in Buffalo ahead of New York’s primary on Tuesday and it didn’t go as planned. Or maybe it went exactly as planned. Who am I to question the apparent genius behind Trump’s political atavism?

Pathos is a legitimate rhetorical appeal, a few things generate as much of an emotional response with Americans than the events of 9/11, 2001. Since that was 15 years ago and there are people alive today who can drive that don’t remember it, this was the day when a group of Saudi extremists knocked down the World Trade Center in New York and damaged the Pentagon in Washington.

“I was down there and I watched our police and our firemen, down on 7-11, down at the World Trade Center, right after it came down, and I saw the greatest people I’ve ever seen in action,” Trump said, continuing:

I saw the bravest people I’ve ever seen, including the construction workers, including every person down there. That’s what New York values are about.

Part of me wants to think that was an innocent gaffe, but I wake up. No, see, this is a very clear demonstration how cynical politics have become in the United States — the political class is so cynical that the people who are playing us can’t even be bothered to get their emotional appeals right.


Feature image via Flickr

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