Even This Pastor Thinks Kim Davis And Her Supporters Are Total Twits


Recently, due to her own criminal actions, Kim Davis has become a martyred heroine to a large fraction of the extremist, right-wing Christian subculture. Her choice to impose religious rule from a position of authority, even after a lawful order from multiple judges compelling her to do so, landed her ridiculous butt in jail for contempt of court.

Although, sadly she has been released, it’s just a matter of time before she’s locked up again.

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The crux of the problem is conservative Christians’ inability to understand what religious freedom really means. I’ll give you a hint: its definition is not what right-wing nut job religious zealots think it is.

It seems Baptist Pastor Jonathan Davis also recognized that there is a sad lack of understanding in the minds of those who comprise the American conservative Christian demographic.

To tweak a quote from, The Princess Bride:

 They keep using that phrase, I don’t think it mean what they think it means!

Jonathan Davis (no relation) wrote an excellent open letter explaining why Kim Davis and her support team — Mike Huckabee and Ted Cruzare all twits of the highest order:

Religious liberty is at the core of the Kim Davis saga, just not the way most people think.

As I watch the news and hear countless pundits and politicians cite concerns over religious liberty, I can’t help but think – many people’s definition of religious liberty is way off base. Additionally, many Baptists seemingly have little knowledge of religious liberty as Baptists have historically understood it.

He’s absolutely right, because the right-wing think freedom of religion only applies to Christianity. If you don’t worship their god, you’re sh*t out of luck.

Pastor Davis goes on to say:

Say the words, ‘religious liberty is at stake!’ and people come out of the woodwork claiming nation-wide religious persecution. Many Christians feel Kim Davis is a martyr in the struggle for religious liberty concerning gay marriage.

Again, many conservatives believe that only Christianity is being attacked, as opposed to all of the other religions in our melting pot — which is, of course, total BS. The Pastor says he agrees that “religious liberty is at stake,” but not in the way in which Davis supporters think.

What would it mean if Davis was allowed to get away with her religious bigotry? Here are some possible scenarios:

  • What if the clerk was Anabaptist or Quaker and refused to issue gun or concealed carry licenses?
  • What if the clerk was Episcopal and decided on religious grounds to not give marriage licenses to Protestant ministers? (Which happened regularly in Virginia before the Bill of Rights)
  • What if a health department official was Muslim, and refused to grant licenses or health permits to establishments that sell pork products?
  • What if a clerk refused to assemble a jury for a trial because she disagreed with the law the defendant had violated?
  • What if a clerk, based on religious convictions, decided to throw out all African American ballots after an election? (Circa 1950’s)
  • Or what if a clerk, on religious grounds, refused to issue a marriage license to an interracial couple? (Like what happened in Virginia in the 1970’s)

As Pastor Davis explained, all of those things did, indeed, happen, and in each case the people responsible were all slapped down by the courts. Why? Because, in this country, elected officials do not have more power than the Supreme Court and they have to abide by the Constitution. The Constitution is here to protect us from individual bigoted beliefs and government overreach.

Kim Davis can have all of the personal religious opinions she wants, but the moment she started forcing those beliefs on other people, that is when she and all of her supporters threatened the freedoms of everyone in this country. THAT is why she went to jail. Pastor Davis said what the rest of us have been saying all along.

To read the rest of his epic takedown, click HERE.

Goodnight, “Religious Freedom Argument,” goodnight.

Feature image via Flikr

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