Rosebud Sioux Tribe Declares GOP’s Keystone XL Authorization An ‘Act of War’


After four years of collecting taxpayer-funded salaries for doing absolutely nothing, our cocky GOP-led House just gave the go-ahead for the Keystone XL pipeline.

Keystone XL may seem like an ideal way to celebrate their midterm victory — however short-term that may prove to be — but those short-sighted, arrogant Republicans forgot about something:

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Some of the land Keystone XL is supposed to run through belongs to the Great Sioux Nation which consists of 20,000 people in 7 different tribes in the Great Plains, and is centered in South Dakota. Oops. And some folks in these tribes flat out say, “no permit, no pipeline.” And whatever permit TransCanada had, it expired back in June.

Indian Country Today reports the Rosebud Sioux oppose Keystone XL and have declared the House of Representatives’ authorization of the Keyston XL pipeline to be “an act of war.”

Rosebud Sioux President Cyril Scott announced:

“The House has now signed our death warrants and the death warrants of our children and grandchildren. The Rosebud Sioux Tribe will not allow this pipeline through our lands. We are outraged at the lack of intergovernmental cooperation. We are a sovereign nation, and we are not being treated as such. We will close our reservation borders to Keystone XL. Authorizing Keystone XL is an act of war against our people.”

Whoa. That’s a pretty strong message.

The Rosebud Sioux and the Great Sioux Nation both adopted resolutions against Keystone XL in February, 2013.

The House passed the bill, but it still needs to get through the Senate on Nov. 18th… after which President Barack Obama would slap a big, fat VETO on it.

Fears about the environmental damage Keystone XL will cause — in particular KXL’s threats to the Ogalalla Aquifer, on which the dry high-plains states all depend upon for their water supply — have made unlikely allies. Farmers, ranchers, and Native Americans have joined together in the Cowboys and Indians Alliance to vehemently oppose KXL.

KXL Map with pipeline to run through Ogalalla Aquifer and the Great Sioux Nation

If approved, KXL would run through the Sioux Nation, and the Ogalalla Aquifer, upon which High Plains states depend for their water supply. Keystone XL map, Wildlife Federation; Sioux Nation map, Walk In Beauty; Ogalalla Aquifer map, cc 2011 via Wikimedia Commons.


Featured photo: Matt Sloan, Bold Nebraska.

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