PizzaGate Gunman Listens To Alex Jones And Is Covered In Tattoos Of Bible Verses


On Sunday, Edgar M. Welch, 28, of Salisbury, North Carolina hopped in his car and drove to a pizzeria in Washington, D.C. Thanks to a fake news report, he was convinced that Comet Ping Pong, the pizza shop, served as a front for a pedophile ring involving Hillary Clinton. So he felt compelled to travel the 350 miles with his trusty assault rifle just to take a “closer look” and “shine some light on it.”

The New York Times interviewed Welch and what they found is disturbing. The PizzaGate gunman told them that after “recently having internet service installed at his house,” he was finally “able to look into it.”

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The Times reports:

He said that substantial evidence from a combination of sources had left him with the “impression something nefarious was happening.” He said one article on the subject led to another and then another. He said he did not like the term fake news, believing it was meant to diminish stories outside the mainstream media, which he does not completely trust.

Welch said that he “has listened to Alex Jones, whose radio show traffics in conspiracy theories and who once said that Mrs. Clinton ‘has personally murdered and chopped up’ children.”

Welch explained that “he had grown religious in the last few years. Tattooed on his back are Bible verses: ‘Even youths grow tired and weary, and young men stumble and fall, but those who hope in the Lord will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles; they will run and not grow weary, they will walk and not be faint.'”

The gunman said he “felt his ‘heart breaking over the thought of innocent people suffering.'” Once he got to the pizzeria, there was an abrupt change of plans,” the Times continues. “Mr. Welch would not say why he took a military-style assault rifle inside the restaurant and fired it. According to court documents, Mr. Welch said he had come armed to help rescue the children.”

“The intel on this wasn’t 100 percent,” Welch admits.

The fake news story in question claimed that Clinton and her campaign chairman John Podesta are running a child sex trafficking ring out of the pizzeria. (They aren’t.) At one point, the son of Donald Trump’s incoming national security advisor tweeted the story, adding credibility to the viral hoax. His father shared a similar story as well.


Featured image via Alex Wong/Getty Images

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